President Joe Biden’s whopping $2 trillion infrastructure plan seemed like the perfect Christmas gift for the American public. However, things are not as glorious as they may seem. Several authorities have expressed their dissatisfaction with the projects, claiming that the Biden Administration’s priorities are completely off the mark.

Lori Spragens, Executive Director at the Association of State Dam Safety has voiced her concerns claiming that the bill is “missing something.”

Spragens declared that fixing dams is the need of the hour and yet, there was no mention about the dams in the 12,000-word document. Out of 90,000 dams in America, the majority of them are in dire need of an upgrade, said Spragens. The Executive Director also pointed out that an infrastructure plan should include funds for dams’ up-gradation.

Dam safety not accounted for in President Biden’s massive infrastructure planAlthough the White House has refused to comment on these claims, an official has claimed that President Biden’s controversial plan has $17 million allocated on waterways, which do include dams.

It is important to note that several groups are casting a duel for a bigger share of the spending plan, increasing the challenge for the Biden Administration to coax Congress members into getting on board with the plan in its entirety. Even at present, negotiations are still in process as claimed by a Michigan Democrat, Debbie Dingell. She recently reinitiated legislation that would ensure a substantial amount of money is allocated for dams. Moreover, Dingell also acknowledged that President Biden’s infrastructure plan will provide sufficient resources to cover dam up-gradation.

Other staunch advocates of dam up-gradation have claimed that their cause is dampened by the fact that most people who reside in areas surrounding the dams are oblivious to the impending threat. They argue that various dams that were constructed a long time ago are no longer sustainable and we’re not doing what they were supposed to do. Hence, it is important for the officials to educate people about the conditions of dams, says Brian Graber who serves as a Director of the river restoration at American Rivers.