A new Omicron Sub-Variant has been identified by WHO scientists as BA.2 after its first BA.1 form that ravaged countries throughout the world due to its high transmissibility. Scientists have confirmed that despite being almost similar in its symptoms to the BA.1 the new Omicron Sub-Variant has an ever-higher transmission rate than its previous form.

WHO official Dr. Boris Pavlin confirmed that vaccines are widely helpful against the Omicron variant, including both of its forms, but the new sub-variant is more likely to be able to go through the protective shield of the vaccination, affecting fully vaccinated individuals as well.

WHO official Dr. Boris Pavlin
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Dr. Pavlin said in his statement to the press, “Looking at other countries where BA.2 is now overtaking, we’re not seeing any higher bumps in hospitalization than expected,” adding, “Vaccination is profoundly protective against severe disease, including for Omicron. BA.2 is rapidly replacing BA.1. Its impact is unlikely to be substantial, although more data are needed.”

There has been a Danish study that confirmed that the new Omicron Sub-Variant BA.2 is more infectious than its previous form, which is likely the reason behind the new uptick in cases, despite the high vaccination rates as compared to previous pandemic months.

Reuters reports the study conducted on 8,500 Danish houses suggests, “We conclude that Omicron BA.2 is inherently substantially more transmissible than BA.1, and that it also possesses immune-evasive properties that further reduce the protective effect of vaccination against infection.”

It is also the same study that confirms the fact that the new variant can breach the vaccination protection, “We conclude that Omicron BA.2 is inherently substantially more transmissible than BA.1, and that it also possesses immune-evasive properties that further reduce the protective effect of vaccination against infection.”

Prof Seshadri Vasan who is a researcher on COVID-19 based in Australia said regarding the Omicron Sub-Variant and the Danish study, “So far, evidence from our colleagues in Denmark show that while it could spread faster, there is no evidence of increased severity. Therefore it is important to keep calm and continue existing measures such as getting ourselves the vaccinated, including the booster dose, and following social distancing, masks and local guidelines.”